How employer super contributions work

While you are working, your employer is required to make contributions into your superannuation fund equal to a rate of 9.5% of your salary.1 This is called the Superannuation Guarantee (SG) and is a before-tax contribution.

Your employer is required to make payments at least quarterly, and you should be eligible to receive employer contributions if you are aged 18 or older and earn more than $450 a month. To see how much super you're being paid, check your payslip or log in to Member Online.2

Extra employer contributions

Some employers, including the Queensland Government, may make higher contributions to your super.

Non-Government employees

While employers are usually only required to pay super at the compulsory rate of 9.5% at a minimum, it’s a good idea to check with your employer directly to make sure you are maximising your employer contributions. Some employers have special arrangements in place, for example, they may pay super at a higher rate, or will pay more if you make extra super contributions yourself.

There are also other ways you can grow your super in addition to the contributions from your employer, such as making additional voluntary after-tax contributions or regularly salary sacrificing.

Queensland Government employees

Many Queensland Government employees – such as those working for Queensland Health or the Department of Education – are required to make 'standard contributions' of between 2% and 5% of their fortnightly superannuable salary.3

By making these standard contributions, your employer will also pay extra into your super fund, helping you grow your retirement savings.

Your standard contribution rate will depend on your account type and will be different if you are a police officer, so click the tab relevant to you below.

You pay Employer pays Total paid into your super
2% 9.75% 11.75%
3% 10.75% 13.75%
4% 11.75% 15.75%
5% 12.75% 17.75%
You pay Employer pays Total paid into your super
3% 12% 15%
4% 14% 18%
5% 16% 21%
6% 18% 24%

With a Defined Benefit account, your retirement benefit is calculated by multiplying a number that reflects both your years of service and your contribution rate (your multiple) with your final salary. Find out more about Defined Benefit accounts.

You pay Your multiple increases by
2% 0.135
3% 0.160
4% 0.185
5% 0.210

If you have a Defined Benefit account and have been paying standard contributions of less than 5%, this may result in you having less when you retire. It's possible to catch up by paying standard contributions of up to 8%. Call us on 1300 360 750 to find out if you're eligible.

You pay Your multiple increases by
3% 0.140
4% 0.175
5% 0.210
6% 0.245

If you are a police officer, have a Defined Benefit account, and have been paying standard contributions of less than 6%, this may result in you having less when you retire. It's possible to catch up by paying standard contributions of up to 9%. Call us on 1300 360 750 to find out if you're eligible.

How Queensland Government employees can make standard contributions

Standard contributions can be made either before-tax by salary sacrificing, or as after-tax contributions. If you earn more than $37,000 a year, salary sacrificing could be a tax-effective way of making standard contributions as you pay 15% tax on your contributions, instead of your marginal tax rate (which could be up to 47%, including the Medicare Levy of 2%). You could then contribute your tax savings into your superannuation, potentially growing your retirement savings without decreasing your take-home pay.

Case study Couple on beach looking happy

Jane works for the Queensland Government. She earns $72,500 per year, and makes standard after-tax contributions to her super of $3,625 (5%) per year.

If she makes this contribution to her super as a before-tax salary sacrificed contribution, her taxable income will decrease from $16,560 per year to $15,309. This means her take home pay increases from $53,766 to $54,944.4

Jane could then contribute the difference to her super, meaning she is growing her retirement savings without affecting her take-home pay.

What else to consider

  • Some Queensland Government employers have alternative contribution arrangements. If you're unsure what your employer offers, check with your payroll office.
  • Whether or not you make standard contributions can impact the default insurance cover you will receive.
  • Salary sacrificing can be tax-effective, but it’s not right for everyone. Find out more.

How to get started

Take the next step to maximise your employer contributions. For non-Government employees, simply contact your payroll office to discuss your options.

For Queensland Government employees, you can start or change your regular after-tax super contributions by completing this form (pdf) and giving it to your payroll office. If you would like to salary sacrifice your standard member contributions, please contact your payroll office directly.

For more information about employer contributions, read our Personal Contributions Guide (pdf).