The age you can get your super

Superannuation is a compulsory, long-term investment designed to help you prepare financially for retirement. For many Australians, super could be a main source of retirement income, and there are rules around when you can access it to keep your savings for your future.

Age Rules for accessing your super
Age 65 or over You can access your super, without restrictions, even if you're still working.1
Age 60 to 64 You can access your super as long as you are retired. If you're not ready to retire, you could draw on some of your savings while you’re still working by opening a Transition to Retirement Income account.

If you are under 60 years of age, you must have reached your preservation age and be permanently retired to access your super. Your preservation age is a minimum age, set by the Australian Government, that your super must be ‘preserved’ until. The preservation age is between 55 and 60, depending on the year and month you were born.

If you're not ready to retire, you could draw on some of your savings while you’re still working by opening a Transition to Retirement Income account.

Work out your preservation age

Date of birth Age you can access your super
Before 1 July 1960 55
1 July 1960 - 30 June 1961 56
1 July 1961 - 30 June 1962 57
1 July 1962 - 30 June 1963 58
1 July 1963 - 30 June 1964 59
From 1 July 1964 60

If you stop work on or after turning 60, you are able to access the superannuation you have accumulated up until that point. If you decide to return to work, you will need to wait until your employment ends before you can access any of the new contributions.

How to access your super

Once you've turned 65 – or have met the conditions to access your super – there are a number of ways to draw on your retirement savings. You can access your super as:

Learn more about ways to make a withdrawal from your super.

What else to consider

  • Depending on your age, withdrawals and payments from your super may be taxed. If you're over 60 years of age, it is tax free. If you are under 60 years of age, the taxable portion of any payments will be taxed at your marginal tax rates, however you will receive a 15% tax offset. Learn more about how your super is taxed.
  • Lump sum withdrawals and payments from you super can also impact any benefits you are receiving from the Department of Human Services. Managing government benefits, such as the Age Pension, can be complex, and small changes can have a big impact, so it pays to get personal financial advice to make sure you maximise your super in retirement.

Accessing your super early

While your super is generally locked away until you are retired, there are some circumstances where you can apply to take it out early. Find out more.