When an employee's work type changes, their superannuation options can change too. For example, temporary and permanent employees of a Queensland Government department, who started work after 1 May 2000, need to make standard member contributions to an Accumulation account. However, a number of Queensland Government employers don’t require temporary and permanent employees to contribute.

Casual employees aren’t required to make personal standard member contributions, but they may choose to make contributions to an Accumulation account. Casual employees can’t contribute to a Defined Benefit account.

If you’re unsure of the QSuper membership arrangements for your employees, please get in touch with our Employer Help Desk.

Some useful answers

What should I do if a permanent or temporary employee becomes casual?

Match your employer payments to the employee's contribution

Casual employees aren’t required to contribute standard member contributions, but in most cases they can if they want to (and they’ll receive a higher employer super payment as a result). If they’re eligible, and they want to contribute between 2% and 5%, just match your employer payment accordingly. Alternatively, if they don't want to make standard member contributions, make an employer payment that’s equal to the SG rate of their ordinary time earnings.

Notify the employee

Not everyone realises the effect a change in employment status will have on their super and insurance – so please let your employees know. You should also encourage them to get in touch with us if they need more information.

If your employee contributes to a Defined Benefit account

Casual employees can’t contribute to a Defined Benefit account. If a permanent or temporary employee with a Defined Benefit account becomes a casual employee, their superannuation will be paid to an Accumulation account. These employees must contact us to talk about the options with their Defined Benefit account.

What should I do if a casual employee becomes permanent or temporary?

Your employee can start contributing to an Accumulation account

If a casual employee becomes a non-casual, in most cases you’ll need to start paying standard member contributions to an Accumulation account. Once the casual status is removed from the contribution payment file, they’ll receive four units of death and total permanent disability (TPD) insurance and income protection insurance.

Match your employer payment to the employee's contribution

In most cases, employees must contribute from between 2% to 5% of their salary to QSuper (some employers don't require their non-casual employees to contribute). If the employee does start making standard contributions, the compulsory employer contribution must be an amount equal to the employee contribution, plus an additional 7.75%, up to a maximum of 12.75%.

Ask your employee to download an Accumulation Account Guide.

What should I do if an employee frequently switches between casual and non-casual employment with the same employer?

You should give your employee all the options that apply to their new employment status each time they change. Generally, this will mean continuing your super payments to the existing account. If a non-casual employee with a Defined Benefit account becomes a casual, you’ll need to record them as a ‘leaver’ and ‘starter’ in your contribution payment file.